3-D Design

AP STUDIO ART 3-D Design SUMMER ASSIGNMENT

NO. 3: GO SHOPPING! GET ART SUPPLIES!

a.

v03611000000-st-01-strathmore-visual-journal-mixed-media

Visual Journal: If you haven’t already, purchase a sketchbook or use a recycled book.

I personally recommend the Visual Journal Strathmore Series in either“Bristol Vellum or Mixed Media”.  Keep in mind that the “Mixed Media” paper has the thickest paper and therefore has fewer sheets. Your Visual Journal should be your new best friend this summer.  You need to carry it with you every day, everywhere! Draw in it, write in it, scribble it, paint in it, glue things into it, cut the pages , change the way the visual journal looks to make it look like your own book. At the end of the summer it should reflect YOU and your experiences throughout the summer. Work in your visual journal is an ongoing process that will help you make informed and critical decisions about the progress of your work. Your visual journal is the perfect place to try a variety of concepts and techniques as you develop your own voice and style.

b. GO TO AN ART SUPPLY STORE!…and purchase the suggested materials on the supplies list below. Experiment with the suggested supplies and any other supplies you have. Keep your failures as well as successes. Don’t throw anything away! You’ll need these supplies to complete the summer assignments.

Durham: A.C. Moore and Micheal’s (don’t buy anything without a coupon! – there is an app for your phone with 40-60% off coupons) Lowe’s, Home Depot

Raleigh: Jerry’s Art-a-Rama

On-Line: Dick Blick, Cheap Joe’s

***Also, get with another 3-D Design student in your class because you both/all might be able to share some of these supplies!

  • Pencils/Graphite
  • Erasers — kneaded, & “Magic Rub”
  • X-acto blade with a cap
  • heavy duty pair of scissors
  • Hot Glue gun and glue sticks
  • Large glue stick
  • A canvas bag with zippers and handles. (Like an electrician’s tool bag)
  • A roll of chicken wire (share able)
  • pliers
  • needle-nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • several different gauges of wire
  • Masking tape: several sizes
  • Other supplies based on student’s choice: If there is an art material that you really enjoy, get a good set, because you will use it. Examples:

Paint set (Liquitex Basics or Golden) & brushes, gesso or KILNZ, a set of clay tools, glazes (Cone 5) a color palette that you want *look for dinner safe type (share able) Pigma Micron Pens (varying sizes and colors)

No. 4: VISUAL JOURNAL – Brainstorm! (visually…)

Visual Journal/Sketchbook Pages Requirements:
• 10 or more pages

• all 1 post on WordPress, titled ‘PHOTO JOURNALS’ • above each entry give a topic name

Here is a link to some EXAMPLES:

PINTEREST boards

1. art: ap sketchbooks and mindmaps

2. art: ap sketchbooks and mindmaps – 3D

3. Amanda Duke’s PINTEREST boards

Other websites:

4. Student Art Guide

  RULES for working in your visual journal:

  1.  DO NOT make “perfect” drawings. Make imperfect drawings; make mistakes; make false starts. Let your hand follow your feelings, not what your brain is telling you to do.
  2. ALWAYS FILL the page you are working on. Go off the edges whenever possible. (OPEN COMPOSITIONS) Do not make dinky little drawings in the center of the page, make every square inch count for something.
  3. Do not start something and abandon it. Go back later, change it, and make it into something else. Being able to rescue bad beginnings is the sign of truly creative mind.
  4. Always finish what you start no matter how much you don’t like it.
  5. Fill at least half your visual journal before the beginning class!
  6. DO NOT DRAW FROM PHOTOGRAPHS, magazines, etc. The use of published photographs or the work of other artists for duplication is plagiarism. Draw from observation, things you see in the world. Learn to translate the dynamic three-dimensional world into a two- dimensional world.
  7. NO CUTE, PRETTY, PRECIOUS, ADORABLE, TRITE images. This is a college-level art class, not a recreation program to make pretty pictures to hang in your house. Expect your ideas about what makes art good to be challenged.
  8. Don’t be boring with your work. Challenge us!
  9. Avoid showing your work to others unless you know they are going to understand what you are trying to do in your visual journal. You don’t need negative feedback when you are trying out new ideas or experimenting. This is a place for risk-taking. Don’t invite criticism unless you are confident that it won’t derail your free spirit.

Ways to work in your visual journal (these are suggestions):

  •  Draw, draw, draw, paint, paint, paint, collage, draw, draw, paint, collage, etc.
  • Use pencils, pens, crayons, sticks, charcoal, burnt matches, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, fingers, pine straw, fingers, basically anything that will make a mark. You have the power to make a mark.
  • Draw what you SEE in the world. No drawings from published images (plagiarism) or personal photographs. You need to learn to draw without the crutch of someone else’s composition or flattening of space.
  • Use gesture, line, and value in your drawings. Try to create a sense of light and depth in your images.
  • Use the principles of perspective to show depth in a drawing.
  • Glue stuff into your sketchbook, i.e., ticket stubs, gum wrappers, tin foil, lace, lists, receipts, sand, leaves, twigs, pebbles, shells, earrings, shoelaces, whatever. Make a collage with stuff. Add these things to pages that you started but don’t like. Let your imagination go wild.
  • Build the pages up by layering things, paint on top of collage, newspaper, and drawing. Attach pieces of fabric and photographs and paint over parts of them. What did you do? What are you trying to say?
  • Express yourself! Work to develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of your ideas.
  • Make decisions about what you do based on how things look. Go for the tough look, not the easy solution. Do not be trite; say something important about the world we live in.
  • Take a news story and interpret it visually, use abstraction to express an idea.
  • Play around with geometrics and organic forms, interlocking and overlapping to create an interesting composition. Use color to finish the work.
  • Create a self-portrait using distortion, or Cubism, or Impressionism, or Minimalism, or Pop.
  • Create a drawing of the interior of your room.
  • Draw an object in daylight and then again at night by artificial light.
  • Fill 2 pages with a collage of images and words that appeal to you. You must add at least 2 hand drawn images that overlap.
  • Sketch 5 design motifs that you like. They can be from company logos, repeating patterns, etc…
  • Come up with a new design or improvement to an object that currently exists. Think of something that you might use every day. How can you improve it?
  • Illustrate a dream that you have had.
  • Make a detailed drawing of your eye.
  • Make at least 100 gesture drawings from observation of the figure.
  • Make at least 25 contour drawings from observation of anything around you. (The open bag of candy you are eating, etc.) Remember to use the whole page! Fill the space behind the objects you draw. Make it count for something.
  • Make a simple contour drawing of an arrangement of objects. Repeat the drawing four times. Explore different color schemes in each of the four drawings. Write about how the color changes the feeling in each image.
  • Write about your work. Write about what you like about a drawing, what you don’t like about it. Write about your hopes for your artwork. Write about why you like to make art.
  • Write about how your artwork could impact another’s thinking or feeling. Write about what you want to say with your artwork, and what it means to you in a larger sense.
  • Lastly, this experience should be for your growth as an art student, as a person who values art as a means of expression. Keep it for yourself so that you will feel free to work without judgment. Remember this is an ongoing process that uses informed and critical decision making to develop ideas.
  • Bring the book to the second day of class. You will have an opportunity to select the pages you want to share. We will use your experience as an introduction to some of the thinking that you will be engaged in during the AP Studio Art course.

5 VISUAL JOURNALS COMPLETED & UPLOADED by July 17th

5 VISUAL JOURNALS COMPLETED & UPLOADED by August 14th


No. 5: Make some ART!

As an AP studio artist, you are expected to submit quality artwork that can be comparable to artwork produced at the college level.

Your summer assignment is vital to the development of your AP Portfolio. It will add to the required AP sections: Quality, Concentration, & Breadth. In some cases, it will be a realization process for you to understand yourself better as an artist.

Complete 2 Developed Works
Go to the Breadth page of my AP website and go through ALL of the different Breadth assignments. Click here for the Themed Sculpture link.

Be sure to look at all of the images AND read the instructions. Each artwork need to show a at least of 8-10 hours of work to receive a passing grade.

​Artwork Requirements:

*You may NOT borrow my art supplies over the summer. See the list for supplies you’ll need to get. I will, however, give you some paper and loan you a drawing board.

* You may NOT use art you have made in another class- these must be NEW pieces!!!!
DO NOT PUT THESE PIECES OFF!!!

You are expected to create high quality, well- thought out pieces of completed artwork throughout the summer, the measurements should be approximately 18 x 24 inches. (If you go over 18” x 24” it will not be able to go into the quality section of your portfolio.) Keep a sketchbook/visual journal to document the progress and concepts behind your artwork. IF YOU CAN CREATE MORE STUDIO PROJECTS FROM THIS LIST BELOW, THEN DO SO, YOU WILL ONLY BE HELPING YOURSELF COMPLETE YOUR AP PORTFOLIO!

A. MECHANICAL OBJECT WIRE SCULPTURE –
  1.  TYPEWRITER, VINTAGE PHONE, TOASTER, FAN, etc.
  2. A mechanical object  with guts. Should be an object that is okay to destroy because you are going to have to take it apart to be able to sculpt the inside pieces. (DO NOT GRAB YOUR MOM’s $300 Kitchen Aid Mixer and take it apart!)
  3. You don’t have to replicate every single teeny-tiny inside piece – think about balance and rhythm!
  4. Must be @ least 1′ x 1′ x 1′ (height x width x depth)
  5. You can look for inspiration through my PINTEREST boards:

art: clay and sculpture.

B. For your 2nd project, choose 1 of the following themes, then 1 type, and a medium; while focusing on @ least 1 element AND 1 principle or MORE:

CHOOSE 1 THEME:  

  1. INSIDE/OUT
  2. ABOVE & BELOW
  3. ORDER vs. DISORDER

CHOOSE a TYPE to fit your THEME:

  1. ABSTRACT/NON-OBJECTIVE
  2. BOXED 
  3. FIGURATIVE
  4. FUNCTIONAL
  5. GARMENT
  6. HANGING
  7. STACKED
  8. TRANSPORTATION
  9. VESSEL

CHOOSE A MEDIUM:

  1. CARDBOARD
  2. CLAY *I can meet with you over the summer to fire your work in my classroom.
  3. FOAM
  4. FOUND OBJECTS
  5. MIXED MEDIA
  6. WOOD
  7. WIRE

No. 6: UPLOAD your 1st BLOG!

Title for the posts are:

SUMMER ASSIGNMENT: Mechanical Object Wire Sculpture

SUMMER ASSIGNMENT: Theme + Type

For example, SUMMER ASSIGNMENT: Order vs. Disorder – Figurative

Link to the WordPress instructions.

1 PROJECT COMPLETED & UPLOADED by July 17th

LAST PROJECT COMPLETED & UPLOADED by August 14th


A NOTE FROM MRS. ELLER:

Feel free to contact me over the summer, send images for input or critique, let me know what you are up to!

*Please do not call past 8:00, as I have small children with bedtimes!

Suggestions: Set a goal of having artwork of done by a certain date and then make yourself at end a second goal. If you do not do this, you may find yourself at the end of summer and scrambling to create “something” to hand in when school starts. Not the best way to start an AP portfolio. So some self-discipline is a big, big help!

Buddy up with another student taking AP Art and encourage/nag each other. It really does help. It’s too easy to get busy with other things and put off making ART!

Periodically search online for art being made by artists in the media or subject you are working in. I often look at work by contemporary artists – it can give me ideas or help to motivate me to work on my latest piece.

Award Winning Scholastic Art: http://www/artandwriting.org/Galleries

DO NOT HESITATE TO CONTACT ME.

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